77 Nutritious Ingredient Suggestions to make Sure Your Home Made Dog Food stays Balanced

Creating your canine companion's meals from scratch has a lot of great benefits. You get to be in full control over what your dog consumes. Thus, you can create a custom diet that's catered to their specific health needs. The downsides? You have to work a bit harder to ensure that their diet is balanced and nutritious.

To keep their bodies in tip-top shape, you need to provide your pooch with food that has all the essential ingredients and macronutrients.

ingredients to choose from for a home made dog meal

Most commercially available kibble products already contain all the things they need. However, if you're providing homemade meals, you'll have to do all of that hard work yourself. Dogs have unique dietary needs. There's a lot of things they can't eat and some foods provide more nutritional value than others.

While it may be tough at first, supplying a nutritious and delicious homemade meal for your dog is doable. The key is to stick with ingredients that can benefit them. Here a list of 77 ingredient suggestions that can help keep your dog's meals balanced and healthy.

Meats & Proteins


Beef

beef

Beef is highly digestible muscle tissue from cows.

Benefits: High-quality source of protein and amino acids.

Possible Drawbacks: High in cholesterol, so it should be fed in moderation to dogs with health or weight issues.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 190
  • Fat: 20 grams
  • Sodium: 7 milligrams
  • Protein 3 grams

Deboned Chicken

chicken deboned

Deboned chicken meat is a lean source of protein that's commonly used in many popular kibble brands.

Benefits: Affordable and palatable source of protein.

Possible Drawbacks: Some dogs may develop chicken allergy.

Nutritional Value Per Half-Pound

  • Calories: 552
  • Fat: 45 grams
  • Sodium: 91 milligrams
  • Protein 33 grams

Deboned Turkey

deboned turkey

Turkey is another lean protein source. It has fewer calories and fat when compared to chicken.

Benefits: Lean protein source that's great for dogs on a diet.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages

Nutritional Value Per Half-Pound

  • Calories: 456
  • Fat: 36 grams
  • Sodium: 109 milligrams
  • Protein 30 grams

Lamb

lamb meat

This protein source comes from sheep muscle tissue. It's flavorful and contains a complex amino acid profile.

Benefits: High-quality source of protein that's easy for dogs to digest.

Possible Drawbacks: High in trans fats and cholesterol. May not be a good option for dogs with heart and weight problems.

Nutritional Value Per Half-Pound

  • Calories: 552
  • Fat: 45 grams
  • Sodium: 91 milligrams
  • Protein 33 grams

Deboned Duck

Duck meat

Deboned duck meat is high-protein muscle tissue.

Benefits: High in protein and contains vitamins A and B3.

Possible Drawbacks: Naturally high in sodium and fat.

Nutritional Value Per Half-Pound

  • Calories: 409
  • Fat: 18 grams
  • Sodium: 224 milligrams
  • Protein 55 grams

Pork

Pork

Pork is muscle meat that can come from various parts of a pig.

Benefits: A very palatable protein source that's easy to digest. Great for dogs with chicken allergies.

Possible Drawbacks: Higher risk of parasitic infection when not cooked properly.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 107
  • Fat: 10 grams
  • Sodium: 12 milligrams
  • Protein 4 grams

Venison

venison

Venison is used to describe muscle tissue and meat that comes from deer.

Benefits: Lean protein source that's filled with vitamin B.

Possible Drawbacks: High in trans fats and cholesterol. Venison also tends to be more expensive than other protein options.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 45
  • Fat: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 21 milligrams
  • Protein 6 grams

Rabbit

Rabbit meat

Turkey is another lean protein source. It has fewer calories and fat when compared to chicken.

Benefits: Lean protein source that's great for dogs on a diet.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages

Nutritional Value Per Half-Pound

  • Calories: 456
  • Fat: 36 grams
  • Sodium: 109 milligrams
  • Protein 30 grams

More Meats & Proteins

Seafood


Salmon

Salmon fish

Salmon is a lean fish that's high in protein. It should be cooked prior to feeding to dogs.

Benefits: Great source of omega fatty acids.

Possible Drawbacks: Fat content may be too high for dogs with pancreatitis.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 58
  • Fat: 3.5 grams
  • Sodium: 17 milligrams
  • Protein 6 grams

Herring

Herring fish

Herring is a tiny fish found in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. It can be fed raw or cooked.

Benefits: Contains omega fatty acids

Possible Drawbacks: Pickled or smoked herring has high sodium content that could be harmful to canines.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 58
  • Fat: 3 grams
  • Sodium: 33 milligrams
  • Protein 6 grams

Sardines

sardines

Sardines are small fish that are sold in cans. Can be fed raw or cooked as long as it's not covered in sauce.

Benefits: A nutrient-dense protein source that contains omega fatty acids. Also, the short lifespan of the fish decreases the chances of mercury exposure.

Possible Drawbacks: High in sodium.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 330
  • Fat: 21 grams
  • Sodium: 256 milligrams
  • Protein 30 grams

Anchovies

Anchovies

Anchovies are tiny fish that primarily feed on plankton. As a result, they're very healthy food for dogs.

Benefits: An affordable protein source that offers a healthy dose of omega fatty acids.

Possible Drawbacks: High in sodium

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 37
  • Fat: 1 grams
  • Sodium: 29 milligrams
  • Protein 5.5 grams

Crustaceans

Crustaceans

Crustaceans, such as shrimp and crab, are ocean-dwelling creatures that are rich in protein and nutrients.

Benefits: Great source of glucosamine, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and more.

Possible Drawbacks: Must be cooked thoroughly, otherwise, it may expose your dog to harmful bacteria.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 28
  • Fat: less than 0.1 grams
  • Sodium: 31 milligrams
  • Protein 6.5 grams

Green-Lipped Mussel

Green-Lipped Mussel

Mussels are mollusks that contain a strongly muscled organism and a shell. Can be cooked or used to create an extract.

Benefits: Contains EPA, DHA, glucosamine, and chondroitin.

Possible Drawbacks: Can be costly to come by and very high sodium levels.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 49
  • Fat: 1 grams
  • Sodium: 105 milligrams
  • Protein 6.5 grams

Fish Oil

Fish Oil for dogs

Fish oil is created from processed fish. Most commonly, salmon is used.

Benefits: Provides energy and a dose of omega fatty acids for better immunity and healthier skin.

Possible Drawbacks: Can make food greasy, which results in soft stool.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon.

  • Calories: 123
  • Protein 13.5 grams

Fruits


Apples

apple

Apples are a sweet fruit that can be served to dogs in moderation. Seeds must be removed, as they contain cyanide.

Benefits: Source of fiber, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Can also freshen breath.

Possible Drawbacks: Apples have high sugar content, making them a dangerous choice for diabetic dogs.

Nutritional Value 1 Large Apple

  • Calories: 116
  • Fat: Less than 0.5 grams
  • Sugar: 23 Grams
  • Sodium: 2 milligrams
  • Protein 5.4 grams

Blueberries

Blueberries

Blueberries are small fruits that grow on bushes. While they have a skin that feels similar to that of grapes, they're completely safe for dogs.

Benefits: Source of antioxidants and vitamins. May also help to reduce cholesterol levels.

Possible Drawbacks: Blueberries have a lot of natural sugar.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 84
  • Fat: Less than 0.5 Grams
  • Sugar: 14 Grams
  • Sodium: 1 milligrams
  • Fiber 3.5 grams

Pumpkins

Pumpkin

Pumpkins are a fibrous fruit that offers many vitamins and nutrients. It can be fed raw or canned as long as it contains no sugar or seeds.

Benefits: Contains beta-carotene, potassium, vitamin C, and more. Also has a lot of fiber, helping to improve overall digestive health.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 30
  • Fat: Less than 0.5 Grams
  • Sugar: 3 Grams
  • Sodium: 1 milligrams
  • Fiber 0.6 grams

Cranberries

Cranberries

Cranberries are small red fruits that are known for their health benefits.

Benefits: The fruit is a powerful antioxidant that's also used to help provide relief for urinary tract infections.

Possible Drawbacks: Eating too much may lead to gastrointestinal upsets. Moderation is key.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 46
  • Sugar: 4.25 Grams
  • Sodium: 2 milligrams
  • Fiber 3.6 grams

Banana

Banana

Grown on tall trees, bananas are a soft yellow fruit that's sweet and delicious to dogs.

Benefits: Bananas are a healthy alternative to fatty treats. They have potassium, vitamin B6, vitamin C, and plenty of fiber.

Possible Drawbacks: Dogs cannot eat the peels, as they can cause stomach issues.

Nutritional Value 1 Large Banana.

  • Calories: 121
  • Sugar: 16 Grams
  • Sodium: 1 milligrams
  • Fiber 3.5 grams

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe

The cantaloupe melon is a sugary sweet melon that's high in fiber and flavor. It contains a tough rind and seeds inside, so make sure to remove them first.

Benefits: Has vitamin B6, vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, and niacin.

Possible Drawbacks: The fruit is high in sugar, so it should be avoided for dogs with diabetes.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 54
  • Sugar: 13.9 Grams
  • Sodium: 28 milligrams
  • Fiber 1.4 grams

Mango

Mango

Mangos are a vitamin-rich fruit that's fibrous. It has a tough skin and a large pit.

Benefits: Good source of vitamins A, B6, C, and E.

Possible Drawbacks: Eating too much may result in diarrhea and stomach pains.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 99
  • Sugar: 22.5 Grams
  • Sodium: 2 milligrams
  • Fiber 2.6 grams

Pear

Pear

Pears are fruit that grows on trees. Like apples, they have potentially dangerous seeds that need to be removed.

Benefits: Contains vitamin C and vitamin A. Also a good source for fiber.

Possible Drawbacks: High sugar content is not good for diabetic dogs.

Nutritional Value 1 Large Pear

  • Calories:131
  • Sugar: 22 Grams
  • Sodium: 2 milligrams
  • Fiber 7 grams

Vegetables


Sweet Potato

Sweet Potato

Sweet potatoes are typically used in commercially available kibble. These vegetables are distinguished by their pink flesh.

Benefits: The vegetable is a great complex carbohydrate that's slowly absorbed throughout the day. It's also a good source of fiber.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value for 1 Large Sweet Potato

  • Calories: 284
  • Sugar: 3 Grams
  • Sodium: 22 milligrams
  • Fiber 7.5 grams

Carrot

Carrot

These bright orange vegetables can be served to dogs raw or cooked.

Benefits: Carrots contain beta-carotene, which is known help maintain good ocular health.

Possible Drawbacks: May be difficult to digest if raw.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 52
  • Sugar: 6 Grams
  • Sodium: 88 milligrams
  • Fiber 3.5 grams

Alflalfa

Alflalfa

Alfalfa sprouts are leafy greens that are considered to be a super-food for both humans and dogs alike.

Benefits: Source of numerous vitamins and minerals. Alfalfa is also a good source of fiber and offers some extra protein.

Possible Drawbacks: Can cause stomach distress if fed in large quantities.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories:8
  • Sugar: Less than a gram
  • Sodium: 2 milligrams
  • Fiber Less than a gram

Celery

Celery

Whether you give celery to your dog raw or cook it with other ingredients in their favorite meal, the vegetable is safe and beneficial.

Benefits: Celery has very few calories. However, it's filled with potassium, magnesium, and plenty of vitamins. The texture can also help with dental health.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value for 1 Large Celery Stalk

  • Calories: 9
  • Sugar: Less than a gram
  • Sodium: 51 milligrams
  • Fiber 1 grams

Chicory Root

Chicory Root

This ingredient is the root of the chicory, which is a blue flowering plant. The root can be served whole or you could process it to extract the beneficial inulin.

Benefits: Acts as a prebiotic to help improve gut health.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 32
  • Sugar: 7 Grams
  • Sodium: 22 milligrams
  • Fiber Less than a gram

Broccoli

Broccoli

Broccoli is a flowering vegetable that dogs can eat raw or cooked. It's composed of two parts. It's recommended that you serve the florets.

Benefits: Excellent source of vitamins and minerals

Possible Drawbacks: Contains isothiocyanates, which is known to cause gastric distress if consumed in large quantities.

Nutritional Value Per Cup of Florets 

  • Calories: 20
  • Sugar: 1 gram
  • Sodium: 19 milligrams
  • Fiber 1.5 grams

Zucchini

Zucchini

Belonging to the squash family, zucchini are long slender vegetables with a crunchy texture.

Benefits: Low in calories but high in fiber.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value for 1 Large Zucchini

  • Calories: 22
  • Sugar: 8 grams
  • Sodium: 26 milligrams
  • Fiber 3 grams

Spinach

Spinach

Spinach is a leafy vegetable that's crunchy when it's raw, but soft when it's cooked. It can be served to dogs either way.

Benefits: Spinach is a high-fiber food that's full of vitamins. It's also known to improve digestive health.

Possible Drawbacks: Contains oxalic acid, which could lead to kidney issues. Should only be fed in moderation.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 7
  • Sugar: < than half a gram
  • Sodium: 24 milligrams
  • Fiber Less than a gram

Asparagus

Asparagus

Asparagus is a vegetable that grows in stalks.

Benefits: The biggest benefit of asparagus is its fiber. It's very tough and can keep your dog regular.

Possible Drawbacks: Can be tough on the digestive tract the first time your dog eats it. Also, the vegetable makes urine take on a strong odor.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 27
  • Sugar: 2.5 grams
  • Sodium: 3 milligrams
  • Fiber 2.5 grams

More Vegetables

Grains


Brown Rice

Brown Rice

Brown rice is a small grain that must be cooked well for easy digestion.

Benefits: The grain is a source of iron, magnesium, and omega-3 oils. Also acts as healthy carbohydrate.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value Per Ounce

  • Calories: 46
  • Carbohydrates: 9.5 grams
  • Fiber: Half a gram

Millet

Millet

Millet is a gluten-free grain that's easy to digest.

Benefits: Contains vitamin B, iron, and potassium. Gluten-free nature also makes it a great choice for dogs with allergies.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 207
  • Carbohydrates: 41 grams
  • Fiber: 2.3 grams

Rye

Rye

Nutritious whole grain.

Benefits: Rich in vitamins and nutrients, rye is also a complex carbohydrate that helps to control your dog's blood sugar levels.

Possible Drawbacks: Not suitable for dogs with allergies.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 571
  • Carbohydrates: 128 grams
  • Fiber 25 grams

Wheat Germ

Wheat Germ

Wheat germ is the reproductive portion of a wheat plant.

Benefits: Lower gluten levels and excellent source of vitamins.

Possible Drawbacks: May not benefit dogs with allergies.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 414
  • Carbohydrates: 59.5 grams
  • Fiber: 15 grams

Brewer's Yeast

Brewer's Yeast

Brewer's yeast is a living fungus that can be beneficial to your dog's health.

Benefits: Helps with digestive health and is one of the best sources of natural B vitamins.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon

  • Calories: 55
  • Carbohydrates: 6 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams

Barley

Barley

Barley is a pearly grain that retains most of its nutrients even after cooking.

Benefits: High in fiber and contains selenium and copper.

Possible Drawbacks: No suitable for dogs with celiac disease or allergies.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 193
  • Carbohydrates: 44 grams
  • Fiber 6 grams

Rice Bran

Rice Bran

Rice bran is the outer layer of rice grain. It's what's left after the center is removed.

Benefits: A high-quality source of B vitamins, magnesium, and omega-3 oils. Rice bran is also has a lot of fiber for digestive health.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantage.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 373
  • Carbohydrates: 58 grams
  • Fiber: 24.5 grams

Flaxseed

Flaxseed

Flaxseeds are a healthy grain that can be served whole. Alternatively, you can provide your dog with extracted flaxseed oil.

Benefits: Filled with omega fatty acids that can benefit your dog's skin and coat.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon

  • Calories: 55
  • Carbohydrates: 3 grams
  • Fiber: 3 grams
  • Sodium: 3 grams

Lentils

Lentils

Despite their small size, lentils are legumes that pack a lot of nutritious punch.

Benefits: Filled with iron and plant-based protein. Also acts as a complex carbohydrate to regulate blood sugar levels.

Possible Drawbacks: Tough skin may cause some stomach irritation.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon

  • Calories: 42
  • Carbohydrates: 7.5 grams
  • Fiber: 1.3 grams
  • Sodium: 1 milligrams

Evening Primrose Oil

Evening Primrose Oil

This oil comes from the flowering Evening Primrose plant. The oil is extracted from the seeds.

Benefits: Contains essential GLA for good health. It's also an anti-inflammatory.

Possible Drawbacks: Too much oil can make stool greasy.

Rapeseed Oil

Rapeseed Oil

Rapeseed oil is extracted from the rapeseed plant. It can be added in small amounts to homemade dog food recipes.

Benefits: Contains healthy omega-3 oils.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Herbs


Parsley

Parsley

Parsley is a fresh and flavorful herb that grows in small shrubs.

Benefits: In addition to being filled with vitamins, parsley is acts as an anti-inflammatory.

Possible Drawbacks: Not safe for dogs with kidney issues.

Nutritional Value Per Cup

  • Calories: 22
  • Carbohydrates: 3.5 grams
  • Fiber: 2 grams
  • Sodium: 34 grams

Rosemary

Rosemary

Rosemary is an aromatic herb that contains many tiny leaves.

Benefits: The herb acts as an antioxidant to support your dog's body.

Possible Drawbacks: Too much of it can lead to stomach issues.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon

  • Calories: 2
  • Carbohydrates: 0.35 grams
  • Fiber: 0.2 grams

Turmeric

Turmeric

Turmeric is a popular spice that comes from the root of the turmeric plant.

Benefits: Turmeric is a natural anti-inflammatory as well as an antioxidant.

Possible Drawbacks: Also acts as a natural color additive, which can cause staining.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon

  • Calories: 29
  • Carbohydrates: 6 grams
  • Fiber 2 grams
  • Sodium: 3 milligram

Marigold Extract

Marigold Extract

Marigold extract comes from the fragrant flower of the same name.

Benefits: Safe source of lutein to support your dog's immune system.

Possible Drawbacks: No known disadvantages.

Green Tea

Green Tea

Green tea leaves come from the tea plant. They are not oxidized, hence why they retain their color.

Benefits: Provides your dog with a boost of antioxidants for improved overall health.

Possible Drawbacks: Contains caffeine, which may cause health issues in high doses.

Supplements


Glucosamine

Description: Glucosamine is a popular joint supplement that's used for both dogs and humans. Supplements are typically made from the shells of crustacean.

Benefits: May help to prevent cartilage from breaking down.

Chondroitin

Description: Chondroitin is usually used alongside glucosamine. It's made of cow cartilage.

Benefits: Works as an anti-inflammatory to support old joints.

MSM

Description: Also known as Methyl-sulphonyl-methane, this supplement is made out of pine bark.

Benefits: May prevent osetoarthritis.

Taurine

Description: Taurine is an amino acid that's found in seafood and meat.

Benefits: Has been shown to help maintain heart health and treat cardiovascular issues.

MOS

Description: MOS, or Mannan-oligo-saccharide, is a supplement that's derived from yeast.

Benefits: It's an active prebiotic that introduces good bacteria to a dog's gut.

Yucca Extract

Description: This ingredient is a beneficial extract that's taken from the root of the Yucca plant.

Benefits: Can help reduce the odor of your dog's stool.

Beet Pulp

Description: Made from sugar beets, this healthy pulp is used in most high-quality dog foods.

Benefits: High-quality source of soluble and insoluble fiber. The pulp can help to keep your dog's system clean and regular.

Tapioca Starch

Description: Tapioca starch is taken from the root of cassava plants.

Benefits: Can be used as an alternative to traditional carbohydrate sources, making it a great choice for allergy sufferers. Also has vitamins and minerals.

Possible Drawbacks: The starch shouldn't be given to dogs with weight issues.

Calcium and Phosphorus

Description: Calcium and phosphorus supplements can be made out of oyster shells and cow milk.

Benefits: Helps to ensure proper bone development and maintain health. May also improve dental health.

Extras


Yogurt

Yogurt

Plain yogurt with no additives can be fed to dogs in small amounts.

Benefits: Yogurt contains beneficial bacteria, essentially acting as a probiotic to improve overall gut health.

Possible Drawbacks: Can result in an upset stomach for some dogs.

Nutritional Value Per Tablespoon

  • Calories: 129
  • Carbohydrates: 12 grams
  • Sugar: 12 grams
  • Sodium: 170 milligrams

Tocopherols

Tocopherols

Description: Tocopherols can come in the form of supplements. They're a natural vitamin that also has some preserving properties.

Benefits: Prevents the oxidation of fats, essentially preserving food. They're also a good source of vitamin E.

Broth

Broth

Description:: Broth is an infused liquid that contains all of the flavors of the meat or vegetables it is cooked with.

Benefits: Can be used to add flavor and provide a dose of nutrients. It's also a great way to rehydrate your dog.

Possible Drawbacks: May increase the overall moisture content of food, resulting in soft stool or diarrhea.

Over to You

This is just a small selection of beneficial ingredients that you can use to concoct your pup's meals. They all offer great benefits that can help your dog thrive. Introduce them into your homemade meals and watch your furry friend reap the benefits.

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